Please contact your healthcare professional for any concerns or questions you have before getting the vaccine.

No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

There are several different types of vaccines in development. All of them teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work

Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines, and these vaccines have undergone the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. This monitoring includes using both established and new safety monitoring systems to make sure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe. These vaccines cannot give you COVID-19.

Learn how the federal government is working to ensure the safety of COVID-19 vaccines

A COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection.

These side effects are common after the vaccine:

  • On the arm where you got the shot
    • Pain
    • Swelling
  • Throughout the rest of your body:
    • Fever
    • Chills
    • Tiredness
    • Headache

Should I call the doctor about my side effects?

In most cases, discomfort from fever or pain is normal. Contact your doctor or healthcare provider if:

    • The redness or tenderness where you got the shot increases after 24 hours.
    • Your side effects are worrying you or do not seem to be going away after a few days.

Find more information about side effects

V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that uses text messaging and web surveys to provide personalized health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Through V-safe, you can quickly tell CDC if you have any side effects after getting the COVID-19 vaccine.

Depending on your answers, someone from CDC may call to check on you and get more information. V-safe will also remind you to get your second COVID-19 vaccine dose if you need one.

  • The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine includes the following ingredients: mRNA, lipids ((4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2-hexyldecanoate), 2 [(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-N,N-ditetradecylacetamide, 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and cholesterol), potassium chloride, monobasic potassium phosphate, sodium chloride, dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate, and sucrose.
  • The Moderna vaccine contains the following ingredients: messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), lipids (SM-102, polyethylene glycol [PEG] 2000 dimyristoyl glycerol [DMG], cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [DSPC]), tromethamine, tromethamine hydrochloride, acetic acid, sodium acetate, and sucrose.
  • The Janssen’s (or Johnson and Johnson) vaccine includes the following ingredients: recombinant, replication-incompetent adenovirus type 26 expressing the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, citric acid, monohydrate, trisodium citrate dihydrate, ethanol, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HBCD), polysorbate-80, sodium chloride.

The vaccine does not contain eggs, gluten, preservatives or latex.

Women who are pregnant, or who are nursing a child, weren’t included in the studies. The groups recommended to receive the vaccines could change in the future. Women should engage in shared decision-making with their primary health care provider.

Women who are pregnant, or who are nursing a child, weren’t included in the studies. The groups recommended to receive the vaccines could change in the future. Women should engage in shared decision-making with their primary health care provider.

You should speak with your doctor performing the surgery about when it is appropriate to take the vaccine. Each procedure has different risks, and may require you to wait longer to receive the vaccine.

You should speak with your doctor performing the surgery about when it is appropriate to take the vaccine. Each procedure has different risks, and may require you to wait longer to receive the vaccine.

Please contact your healthcare professional for any concerns or questions you have before getting the vaccine.

  • If you have had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or an immediate allergic reaction—even if it was not severe—to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.
  • An immediate allergic reaction means a reaction within 4 hours of getting vaccinated, including symptoms such as hives, swelling, or wheezing (respiratory distress).